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I am a mother, a new grandmother, and a teacher. But whatever happens in my life, I keep sewing. I have worked as a political communicator and now as a teacher in my formal life. I have also written extensively on sewing. I have been a frequent contributor and contributing editor of Threads magazine and I write a monthly humour/sewing column for the Australian magazine Dressmaking with Stitches. My first book Sew.. the garment-making book of knowledge will be published in May 2018 and is available for pre-order from Amazonhttps://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=barbara+emodi&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Abarbara+emodi

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Thursday, July 13, 2017

Mistakes sewers make

Feel free to add to this list, most of which was generated by my own mistakes over time. 

Some times I learn my lesson, sometimes I don't.

Here we go:

1. Using up some really good fabric on the wrong pattern because of some dumb head idea that just because you have had it on your shelves for decades it is time you used it to make something. Guaranteed about six weeks after you do this the absolutely perfect pattern for that fabric will show up.

2. Spending huge amounts of time altering and trail sewing the same pants pattern again and again instead of just trying a new pants pattern from another company that just might draft closer to your shape.

3. Killing yourself making a everyone should have one in their wardrobe item, like a hand stitched Chanel jacket, when you know in the back of your head the shape doesn't suit you, and that you are more the kind of lady who makes lunch than the kind of lady who lunches.

4. Having a little bit of thread on all your bobbins and winding not enough for current projects over each one.

5. Cutting out a multi sized pattern because you are too tired to trace it, and then realizing that you want to sew a different size next time.

6. Sewing black fabric with black thread after 10:00 p.m.

7. Not using the pressing cloth because you are in a hurry.

8. Thinking the stitching will look better when you turn it over to the right side.

9. Adding a few inches to the bottom of a pattern and marking that and then cutting out along the pattern pieces, cutting away that extra you wanted to add.

10. Using a light coloured interfacing on a dark fabric because it will never show will it, until you cut those buttonholes open.


That's a start. 

Time to go to bed. Have company this weekend and just realized that I have also volunteered to babysit my daughter's moose sized Golden Retriever male adolescent who likes to sit on people, even those who have allergies.

This list will definitely be continued.

By me, and by you.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Adeline dress in knit

I have the Stylearc  Adeline dress cut out in a specified woven fabric and will be working on that over the weekend. 





But when I had some really nice heavy Ottoman knit left over from a cardigan project (probably should have had that review up first of course) I decided to see how this pattern looked like in a knit first.

The knit worked very well. Basically I love this dress and love this pattern. I am going to wear it right out, I can tell.

Not a lot to the dress from the sewing point of view, but what there is has been very well-drafted. The V-neck is faced in the woven version instructions, but I changed this to a simple cross-over V for my knit edition. The dress also has cut-on sleeves that can be rolled up, and big pockets that I didn't put on here as I just was too short of fabric.


My standard cross-over V neck 

In fact to squeeze this dress out of my remnant yardage I pieced the back at roughly waist seam level. Not ideal but hopefully looks as if it was meant to be.

Obviously a super comfortable dress to wear and a very fast sew.

The Adeline has a higher at the front hem ( I just cover hemmed this) that is not too extreme but I think makes for a nice side view:



As you have probably figured out a long time ago I am more a sew it and throw it on and get a fast picture taken kind of blogger than a thoughtful one who puts time and energy into styling. I just sew and then take a picture and run off to sew something else. I do realize that this does show in my shots but hopefully you can still see enough to do the pattern justice.

These shots were taken as I jumped out of weeding and grass cutting clothes (you can see why those were needed in this picture - but note too the nice vegetable boxes my husband has on the go too) and it apparent why those who are more careful have such nice pictures.

The bright sunlight shows for example why women of a certain age IMO would do well to wear hose whatever the style folks say otherwise, and that knit dresses really do benefit from better than gardening underwear.

That said I did put on different accessories on this dress which made clear to me how broadly useful a style like this is.

First I tried the dress on with my favourite gift to self necklace  -I bought at the height of my empty nest attack from which I am now mostly recovered -  and some suede shoes.


Three eggs for three kids, I am pretty sure I bought this just after having put some kid on a plane a few years ago

Next, when I realized how comfortable this dress was I got to wondering if it was something I could also dress up so I ran in the house and got my favourite dressy shoes and some jewellery - totally matchy of course, but then again I am at the stage of requiring hose so that might be as expected.

Here is the dressed up version and those shoes:





This is such an wonderful pattern I know I am going to make a few more for sure. I haven't given much thought to the cocoon shape up to now but can really see how flattering, in a not sloppy way, it can be.

We will see how it looks in a woven next.